Vizhithiru Movie Review: Well intentioned, well written but not well acted

At the heart of Vizhithiru, there’s a well intentioned, well written story, diluted by weak performances despite the presence of familiar and decent actors like Krishna, Vidharth and Dhansika

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Director: Meera Kathiravan

Cast: Krishna, Vidharth, Dhansikaa, Venkat Prabhu, Erica Fernandez, Thambi Ramaiah, Nagababu and Abhinaya

In Vizhithiru, written, directed and produced by Meera Kathiravan, several characters’ stories interweave during the course of a single night – in the span of 12 hours to be precise – in and around Chennai: a blind father and his daughter frantically search for their missing puppy; a call taxi driver who accidentally becomes a witness to the murder of a reporter; a rich, self-centered, reckless son of a multi-millionaire industrialist; and two small-time crooks who like each other in spite of their flaws.

At the heart of Vizhithiru, there’s a well intentioned, well written story, diluted by weak performances. Despite the presence of familiar and decent actors like Krishna, Vidharth and Dhansika, who have impressed us in the past, Vizhithiru struggles to engage its viewer even with its short running time, never fully succeeding in creating tension or empathy that’s expected from such a tale.

Venkat Prabhu’s story, about the search for his missing dog along with his daughter, doesn’t quite make us empathize with his situation. Tension is needlessly but not effectively created when Venkat and his daughter are separated, though briefly. It’s only when we’re told why finding the dog is crucial do we feel sorry for the characters. Krishna’s story, on the other hand, is one with a lot of potential and it’s a shame it isn’t fully tapped. He’s a witness to a murder and is on the run to not save himself but to honour the death of a loyal reporter. Neither is the chase thrilling nor is Krishna’s attempt to escape from the clutches of death.

The story of Vidharth and Dhansikaa, as small time crooks, is initially fun but isn’t handled well to make it engrossing. In the process of cheating each other, they start to develop feelings but are too afraid to express. We get the hint on many occasions but there’s no closure, no reason to strongly back each other’s feelings. To add to the woes, there’s a needless item number with yesteryear actor-filmmaker T. Rajendher. Even the portion involving Thambi Ramaiah, aimed to evoke laughter, becomes unbearable after a point.

Finally, when all the characters cross paths and unite under unexpected circumstances, the narrative becomes sillier. Nevertheless, Vizhithiru deserves to be applauded for its good intentioned story.

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